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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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The knowledge sphere, social capital and growth of indigenous knowledge-based SMEs in the Thai dessert industry

Yokakul, Nattaka and Zawdie, Girma (2011) The knowledge sphere, social capital and growth of indigenous knowledge-based SMEs in the Thai dessert industry. Science and Public Policy, 38 (1). pp. 19-29. ISSN 0302-3427

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Abstract

Using the case of the Thai dessert industry, this paper highlights the knowledge sector as the driver of activities within the triple helix network and as a basis for the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Knowledge transfer to SMEs and its impact on technological capability development is facilitated by social capital which is influenced by policy initiatives. A survey of 159 firms, drawn from three categories (household-based, community-based and factory-based firms) of the Thai dessert industry provided evidence which suggests that social capital is a major factor enhancing SMEs’ access to knowledge sources. The extent to which government intervention has succeeded in promoting the triple helix as a strategy for the growth of SMEs in the Thai dessert industry is considered empirically.