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Quantitative risk assessment for the acquisition of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in dogs.

Heller, J. and Innocent, G.T. and Kelly, Louise Anne and Reid, Stuart and Mellor, D.J. (2009) Quantitative risk assessment for the acquisition of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in dogs. In: Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Meeting 1st-3rd April 2009. Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Roslin, UK, pp. 23-34. ISBN 978-0-948073-89-2

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Abstract

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging companion animal infection with poorly described zoonotic potential. This study presents a quantitative risk assessment in the form of a second order stochastic simulation model with accompanying logistic regression sensitivity analysis that aims to define the most important factors for MRSA acquisition in dogs. Key findings are that both veterinary and non-veterinary routes of acquisition of MRSA are likely to be relevant for dogs. The most influential predictors for MRSA acquisition in dogs were found to be exposure to MRSA positive family members and attendance at veterinary clinics. Variations in the probability of transmission of MRSA from the (non-veterinary and veterinary) environment and from humans (family members and veterinary staff) were also found to be highly influential for MRSA acquisition in dogs.