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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

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Play in the primary school classroom? The experience of teachers supporting children’s learning through a new pedagogy

Martlew, Joan and Stephen, Christine and Ellis, Jennifer (2011) Play in the primary school classroom? The experience of teachers supporting children’s learning through a new pedagogy. Early Years, 31 (1). pp. 71-83. ISSN 1472-4421

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Abstract

In Scotland in recent years there has been growing interest in a more play-based pedagogy commonly described as Active Learning. The research reported in this article is an exploration of moves towards creating an active play-based learning environment in six Primary 1 classrooms in Scotland and is concerned with (i) the children's experiences in such a play-based active learning environment in school and (ii) their teachers' perspectives on this pedagogical innovation and their roles in supporting the learners. This study examined experiences and perspectives within and across each of the six child-centred and play-focused classes. The main findings suggest that the role of the teacher varies between what could be considered as teacher-intensive and teacher-initiated activities. 'Active' or 'play-based' learning was interpreted differently by teachers; play in some classrooms was peripheral rather than integral to the learning process and curriculum-embedded.