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Modified proton radiography arrangement for the detection of ultrafast field fronts

Quinn, K. and Wilson, P. A. and Ramakrishna, B. and Romagnani, L. and Sarri, G. and Cecchetti, C. A. and Lancia, L. and Fuchs, J. and Pipahl, A. and Toncian, T. and Willi, O. and Clarke, R. J. and Neely, D. and Notley, M. and Gallegos, P. and Carroll, D. C. and Quinn, M. N. and Yuan, X. H. and McKenna, P. and Borghesi, M. (2009) Modified proton radiography arrangement for the detection of ultrafast field fronts. Review of Scientific Instruments, 80 (11). p. 113506. ISSN 0034-6748

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Abstract

The experimental arrangement for the investigation of high-field laser-induced processes using a broadband proton probe beam has been modified to enable the detection of the ultrafast motion of field fronts. It is typical in such experiments for the target to be oriented perpendicularly with respect to the principal axis of the probe beam. It is demonstrated here, however, that the temporal imaging properties of the diagnostic arrangement are altered drastically by placing the axis (or plane) of the target at an oblique angle to the transverse plane of the probe beam. In particular, the detection of the motion of a laser-driven field front along a wire at a velocity of (0.95 +/- 0.05)c is described.