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Aqueous solutions of Uranium (VI) as studied by time-resolved emission spectroscopy: a round-robin test

Billard, I. and Ansoborlo, E. and Apperson, K. and Birch, David and Arpigny, S. and Azenha, M. and Bros, P. and Burrows, H. and Choppin, G. and Couston, L. and Dubois, V. and Fanghenel, T. and Geipel, G. and Hubert, S. and Kim, J. and Kimura, T. and Klenze, R. and Kronenberg, A. and Kumke, M. and Lagarde, G. and Lamarque, G. and Lis, S. and Madic, C. and Meinrath, G. and Moulin, C. and Nagaishi, R. and Parker, D. and Plancque, G. and Sherbaum, F. and Simoni, E. and Sinkov, S. and Viallesoubranne, C. (2003) Aqueous solutions of Uranium (VI) as studied by time-resolved emission spectroscopy: a round-robin test. Applied Spectroscopy, 57 (8). pp. 1027-1038. ISSN 0003-7028

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Abstract

Results of an inter-laboratory round-robin study of the application of time-resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) to the speciation of uranium(VI) in aqueous media are presented. The round-robin study involved 13 independent laboratories, using various instrumentation and data analysis methods. Samples were prepared based on appropriate speciation diagrams and, in general, were found to be chemically stable for at least six months. Four different types of aqueous uranyl solutions were studied: (1) acidic medium where UO2 21 aq is the single emitting species, (2) uranyl in the presence of fluoride ions, (3) uranyl in the presence of sulfate ions, and (4) uranyl in aqueous solutions at different pH, promoting the formation of hydrolyzed species. Results between the laboratories are compared in terms of the number of decay components, luminescence lifetimes, and spectral band positions. The successes and limitations of TRES in uranyl analysis and speciation in aqueous solutions are discussed.