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Containment and holding environments : understanding and reducing physical restraint in residential child care

Steckley, Laura and , Save the Children, Scotland (Funder) (2010) Containment and holding environments : understanding and reducing physical restraint in residential child care. Children and Youth Services Review, 32 (1). pp. 120-128. ISSN 0190-7409

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    Abstract

    There have long been concerns about physical restraint in residential child care and much of the surrounding discussion is negative. Yet in a recent in-depth Scottish study exploring the views of those most directly affected by physical restraint-children, young people and staff-a more complex and nuanced picture emerges. Much of what the 78 study participants said about their experiences can be understood through the theoretical lenses of containment and holding environments. Such an understanding can potentially reduce, and where possible eliminate, the need for physical restraint and can increase the likelihood that when restraints do occur, they are experienced as acts of caring. For this to be possible, both direct practice (between staff and young people), and indirect practice (the ways that staff are supported to work with young people) must be containing. This paper starts by discussing the complex context in which physical restraints in residential child care in Scotland occur and then reviews concepts of therapeutic containment and holding environments. The findings of the study are theorized in relation to containment and holding environments, across identified themes of control, touch, relationships and organisational holding. Implications for practice are offered in conclusion.

    Item type: Article
    ID code: 28800
    Keywords: physical restraint, residential child care, containment, holding environments, touch, relationships, Social pathology. Social and public welfare
    Subjects: Social Sciences > Social pathology. Social and public welfare
    Department: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (HaSS) > School of Social Work and Social Policy > Social Work
    Related URLs:
      Depositing user: Ms Laura Steckley
      Date Deposited: 04 Nov 2010 18:27
      Last modified: 22 May 2013 13:41
      URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/28800

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