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Beyond induction : the continuing professional development needs of early-career teachers in Scotland

Kennedy, Aileen and McKay, J. (2011) Beyond induction : the continuing professional development needs of early-career teachers in Scotland. Professional Development in Education., 37 (4). pp. 551-568.

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Abstract

CPD for teachers in Scotland, as in many other countries worldwide, is receiving increased attention. Within the Scottish context a gap in the CPD framework had been identified for early career teachers who have completed the induction year but are not yet eligible to embark on the Chartered Teacher Programme. Learning and Teaching Scotland, the school curriculum development body for Scotland, therefore commissioned a research project to explore the CPD needs and priorities of these early career teachers and the barriers to their participation. The project employed a three staged methodology: nominal group technique interviews with teachers in four local authorities; a national online survey; and a stakeholder consultation exercise. Results indicate that the early career teachers have a wide range of different needs, in terms of both content and mode of CPD, yet they do not appear to feel strongly about barriers to their participation. The article concludes by outlining policy and practice implications arising from the research.