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Energy storage in the UK electrical network : estimation of the scale and review of technology options

Wilson, Ian Allan Grant and McGregor, Peter G. and Hall, Peter J. (2010) Energy storage in the UK electrical network : estimation of the scale and review of technology options. Energy Policy, 38 (8). pp. 4099-4106. ISSN 0301-4215

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Abstract

This paper aims to clarify the difference between stores of energy in the form of non-rechargeable stores of energy such as fossil-fuels, and the storage of electricity by devices that are rechargeable. The existing scale of these two distinct types of storage is considered in the UK context, followed by a review of rechargeable technology options. The storage is found to be overwhelmingly contained within the fossil-fuel stores of conventional generators, but their scale is thought to be determined by the risks associated with long supply chains and price variability. The paper also aims to add to the debate regarding the need to have more flexible supply and demand available within the UK electrical network in order to balance the expected increase of wind derived generation. We conclude that the decarbonisation challenge facing the UK electricity sector should be seen not only as a supply and demand challenge but also as a storage challenge. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.