Picture of aircraft jet engine

Strathclyde research that powers aerospace engineering...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers involved in aerospace engineering and from the Advanced Space Concepts Laboratory - but also other internationally significant research from within the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering. Discover why Strathclyde is powering international aerospace research...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Mainstreaming the Disability Equality Duty and the impact on public authorities' working practices

Pearson, Charlotte and Watson, Nick and Stalker, Kirsten and Ferrie, Jo and Lerpiniere, Jennifer and Paterson, Kevin (2011) Mainstreaming the Disability Equality Duty and the impact on public authorities' working practices. Social Policy and Society, 10. pp. 239-250. ISSN 1474-7464

[img] Microsoft Word (social_policy_and_society_paper.doc)
social_policy_and_society_paper.doc

Download (76kB)

Abstract

Implemented as part of the 2005 amendments to the Disability Equality Act, the Disability Equality Duty (DED) placed new and important demands on public sector bodies. All such organisations are required to develop policies and working practices which actively promote the equality of disabled people as employees, consumers or visitors. The promotion of equality has to be proactive as opposed to reactive and must be mainstreamed into the normal day to day activities of organisational working practices. Whilst the DED follows on from the framework of previous anti-discrimination legislation set in place over the last fifteen years, it represents a significant change in equality legislation, demands that public sector bodies instigate fundamental changes in their approach towards disability. This article reports on the initial stages of the implementation process of the DED across a range of public sector organisations in England, focussing in particular on how this policy has impacted on mainstreaming. Discussion shows that although organisations show awareness of mainstreaming and its implications for disability equality, there is limited evidence to suggest that the public sector has fully embraced this agenda.