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Are academic outcomes of higher education provision relevant to and deliverable in the workplace setting?

Seagraves, Liz and Osborne, M. and Kemp, I. (1996) Are academic outcomes of higher education provision relevant to and deliverable in the workplace setting? Higher Education, 32 (2). pp. 157-176. ISSN 0018-1560

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Abstract

Current developments in higher education strongly indicate that the way ahead in many disciplines is much closer co-operation between academia and industry. There is growing demand that recognition should be given to learning, irrespective of the environment in which it occurs. This article reflects on what are deemed to be essential components of a degree, and considers how they might be transformed into forms suitable for demonstration in the work environment. The discussion is supported by findings of a survey carried out in conjunction with a development - Structured Industrial Practice Studies - which integrates academic learning and learning in the work environment for full-time students. The findings, however, are of relevance beyond the particular model of learning and mode of attendance. There appears to be potential for achieving in the workplace aspects of courses which, in recent times, have been the prerogative of higher education establishments. However, such potential is variable between working environments and is dependent on higher education providers adapting to different structures in delivery.