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Search-based active optic systems for aberration correction in time-dependent applications

Lubeigt, W. and Poland, S.P. and Valentine, G.J. and Wright, A.J. and Girkin, J.M. and Burns, D. (2010) Search-based active optic systems for aberration correction in time-dependent applications. Applied Optics, 49 (3). pp. 307-314. ISSN 1559-128X

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Abstract

We describe a protocol for the use of a control feedback loop incorporating an iterative optimization routine for a range of time-independent adaptive optics applications. These applications are characterized by the quasi steady state of the aberrative effects (>0:1 s) and contrast, for instance, to astronomical applications where the aberrations constantly vary at frequencies above 10 Hz. For optimal performance in such time-independent applications, the control systems typically require specialized tailoring. A typical example of two different types of time-independent adaptive optics applications-an adaptive optic microscope and an adaptive optic laser platform-are detailed and compared. It is shown that implementing a number of minor, but crucial, application-specific modifications to the control system results in an improved efficiency of an already extremely successful technique for aberration compensation. We present a description of the crucial parameters to consider in a search-based adaptive optics system.