Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Affinity chromatography in dynamic combinatorial libraries: one-pot amplification and isolation of a strongly binding receptor

Besenius, P. and Cormack, P.A.G. and Ludlow, R.F. and Otto, S.R. and Sherrington, D.C. (2010) Affinity chromatography in dynamic combinatorial libraries: one-pot amplification and isolation of a strongly binding receptor. Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, 8 (10). pp. 2414-2418. ISSN 1477-0520

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

We report the one-pot amplification and isolation of a nanomolar receptor in a multibuilding block aqueous dynamic combinatorial library using a polymer-bound template. By appropriate choice of a poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-based support, unselective ion-exchange type behaviour between the oppositely charged cationic guest and polyanionic hosts was overcome, such that the selective molecular recognition arising in aqueous solution reactions is manifest also in the analogous templated solid phase DCL syntheses. The ability of a polymer bound template to identify and isolate a synthetic receptor via dynamic combinatorial chemistry was not compromised by the large size of the library, consisting of well over 140 theoretical members, demonstrating the practical advantages of a polymer-supported DCL methodology.