Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

An approach to determining shelf seawater composition by inversion of in situ inherent optical property measurements

Brown, IC. and Cunningham, Alexander and McKee, D. (2007) An approach to determining shelf seawater composition by inversion of in situ inherent optical property measurements. In: Oceans 2007 Europe International Conference, 2007-06-18 - 2007-06-21.

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Measurement of inherent optical properties (IOPs) of seawater using an AC-9 dual-beam spectrophotometer has become routine on many oceanographic cruises. AC-9 data (a(AC9)(lambda), b(AC9)(lambda) and c(AC9)(lambda)) are frequently used in radiance transfer calculations of water leaving radiances, for use in remote sensing applications. There are at present, however, no generally accepted protocols for the inversion of in situ IOP spectra to obtain estimates of water composition. A model is presented to partition in situ IOP spectra between particulate and dissolved shelf seawater constituents using constituent-specific optical cross-sections. These partitioned IOP spectra are subsequently inverted, yielding estimates of optically significant constituent concentrations. The inversion of IOPs measured in situ enables the calculation of spatial and temporal variability in shelf seawater composition at greatly increased resolution when compared with traditional sample collection and analysis. On moorings, towed bodies and ferry-box systems, this data is greatly needed for validating remote sensing products and to provide information on shelf sea processes.