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Clients' perspectives on traditional vs. altered feedback therapy for rate control: Views of people with Parkinson Disease

Lowit, Anja and Dobinson, C. (2008) Clients' perspectives on traditional vs. altered feedback therapy for rate control: Views of people with Parkinson Disease. In: Conference on Motor Speech, 2008-03-06 - 2008-03-09.

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Abstract

Altered auditory feedback (AAF) can offer an alternative method of rate control for some speakers who have Parkinson Disease (PD). Studies to date have reported the effects of AAF on speaking rate, intelligibility and speech naturalness using quantitative methods and listener perspectives. However, alternative approaches need to be acceptable if they are to be effective and therefore need to be evaluated from the client perspective also. This is particularly important where technological interventions are used. This qualitative study investigated the views and experiences of nine participants who have PD on two approaches to rate control. These were AAF and traditional non-technological methods. An alternating treatment design was used to deliver six sessions of each intervention. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted to obtain the views and experiences of the participants regarding the two approaches. A Framework Analysis was used to analyse and check the data. Insights into the therapy process from the perspective of people with PD are reported, together with issues surrounding the acceptability of AAF. In addition to speech effects, non-speech criteria played an important role in the acceptability of AAF. The client perspective can provide useful insights which may further the development of technology and therapy processes.