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Repetitive speech behavior in PD - relationship to cognition and response to DAF

Lowit, Anja and McLeod, J. and Howell, P. and Brendel, B. (2008) Repetitive speech behavior in PD - relationship to cognition and response to DAF. In: Conference on Motor Speech: Motor Speech Disorders & Speech Motor Control, 2008-03-06 - 2008-03-09.

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Abstract

Speech repetitions can be a symptom of Parkinson's Disease. Although a number of papers have been published on these behaviors, they are still poorly understood. Current opinions vary in relation to how much PD severity, medication and cognition are involved in the manifestation of speech repetitions. Results are particularly unclear in relation to the involvement of cognition, possibly due to baseline measures or control groups being insufficiently wide ranging. The current study therefore investigated healthy participants, those with PD as well as those with dementia in relation to a range of cognitive tests (and motor assessments for PD) and speech disfluencies. In addition, there are currently no reports on how speech iterations in PD respond to DAF. A further aim of the study was to assess the effects of DAF on the fluency behavior of the participants with PD. Participants included 40 speakers with PD (with and without dementia), 20 speakers with dementia but no dysarthria, and 20 age matched healthy control speakers. PD speakers were also assessed for dysarthria and general PD severity. Passage reading data were analyzed in relation to disfluencies as well as speech rate, pausing and rhythm. The results will be discussed in relation to the cognitive and motor speech hypotheses of disfluency in PD.