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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Social cognitive determinants of offending drivers' speeding behaviour

Elliott, M.A. and Thomson, James (2010) Social cognitive determinants of offending drivers' speeding behaviour. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 42 (6). pp. 1595-1605. ISSN 0001-4575

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Abstract

The efficacy of an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was tested in relation to offending drivers'(N= 1403) speeding behaviour. Postal questionnaires were issued at Time 1 to measure intention, instrumental and affective attitude, subjective and descriptive norm, self-efficacy, perceived controllability,moral norm, anticipated regret, self-identity, and past speeding behaviour. At Time 2 (6 months later),subsequent speeding behaviour was measured, again using self-completion postal questionnaires. The extended TPB accounted for 68% of the variation in intention and 51% of the variation in subsequent behaviour. The independent predictors of intention were instrumental attitude, affective attitude, self efficacy,moral norm, anticipated regret and past behaviour. The independent predictors of behaviour were intention, self-efficacy, anticipated regret and past behaviour. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed in relation to targeting road safety interventions.