Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Large-scale distributed computing for accelerated structure solution

Shankland, K. and Griffin, T.A.N. and van de Streek, J. and Cole, Jared H. and Shankland, N. and Florence, A.J. and David, W.I.F. (2009) Large-scale distributed computing for accelerated structure solution. Zeitschrift fur Kristallografie, 30. pp. 227-232. ISSN 0044-2968

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Improvements in SDPD methodology have meant that ever more complex structures are being tackled using global optimisation methods. As a very general rule of thumb, the more complex the structure, the more difficult it is to locate the global minimum in the real-space search. This difficulty can, to some extent, be circumvented by running many instances of the search; for stochastic search methods such as simulated annealing, each instance can be run independently of any other. Such search methods are therefore ideally suited to disposition on a distributed grid-type system that makes use of existing networked compute resources. At the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, the DASH structure solution code has been adapted to run on a Univa UD GridMP system in order to distribute simulated annealing runs across hundreds of computers simultaneously with excellent scaling. The principles outlined are applicable to other structure solution codes and to other grid-type systems, such as the widely used and freely available CONDOR system.