Picture of flying drone

Award-winning sensor signal processing research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers involved in award-winning research into technology for detecting drones. - but also other internationally significant research from within the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering.

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Electrochemical sensing of aptamer-protein interactions using magnetic particle assay and single-use sensor technology

Karadeniz, H. and Erdem, A. and Mayer, G. and Famulok, Michael and Caliskan, A. (2009) Electrochemical sensing of aptamer-protein interactions using magnetic particle assay and single-use sensor technology. Electroanalysis, 21 (11). pp. 1278-1284. ISSN 1040-0397

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

A magnetic particle assay has been designed herein that can report the interactions of DNA aptamers with their cognate protein targets lysozyme (LYS) and human thrombin (THR). Electrochemical sensing of the biomolecular recognition between each aptamer and its target was explored by using a disposable graphite electrode, PGE, in combination with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The magnitudes of the oxidation signals of LYS and THR were measured at +780 mV and +680 mV, respectively, after interaction with the cognate aptamers attached to the surface of magnetic particles. The detection limits estimated for signal to noise ratios above 3.0 correspond to the concentrations of 10.77 μg/mL LYS (769 nM) and 2.00 μg/mL THR (54.5 nM). Our aptamer based approach that combines magnetic particles with a disposable graphite electrode performs well compared to other aptamer-based sensor-formats for quantitative protein detection with respect to sensitivity, selectivity, detection limit, and reproducibility.