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What did you just call me? European and American ratings of the valence of ethnophaulisms

Rice, Diana R. and Abrams, Dominic and Badea, Constantina and Bohner, Gerd and Carnaghi, Andrea and Dementi, Lyudmila I. and Durkin, Kevin and Ehmann, Bea (2010) What did you just call me? European and American ratings of the valence of ethnophaulisms. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 29 (1). pp. 117-131. ISSN 0261-927X

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Abstract

Previous work has examined the relative valence (positivity or negativity) of ethnophaulisms (ethnic slurs) targeting European immigrants to the United States. However, this relied on contemporary judgments made by American researchers. The present study examined valence judgments made by citizens from the countries examined in previous work. Citizens of 17 European nations who were fluent in English rated ethnophaulisms targeting their own group as well as ethnophaulisms targeting immigrants from England. American students rated ethnophaulisms for all 17 European nations, providing a comparison from members of the host society. Ratings made by the European judges were (a) consistent with those made by the American students and (b) internally consistent for raters' own country and for the common target group of the English. Following discussion of relevant methodological issues, the authors examine the theoretical significance of their results.