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A developmental investigation of the relationship between appraisals and peer self-esteem in children experiencing peer-aggression

Howe, Christine and Hunter, Simon C. and Heim, Derek and Durkin, K. and Bergin, D. (2007) A developmental investigation of the relationship between appraisals and peer self-esteem in children experiencing peer-aggression. In: Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, 2007-03-29 - 2007-04-01.

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Abstract

Transactional models of stress and coping emphasize the role played by cognitive appraisals in determining psychological adjustment (Lazarus, 1999). This proposition has been supported by research examining young people's adjustment in relation to family conflict and break-up (Grych et al., 1992). Furthermore, this literature suggests that there is a change in the relationship between appraisals and adjustment at around 10 years of age: specificity of appraisal type (e.g. threat, blame) becomes relevant to outcome after 10 years, whereas before 10 there are either no effects of appraisal on adjustment or a diffuse effect of 'negative' appraisals more generally (Jouriles et al., 2000). However, it is currently unclear whether this developmental progression can be generalized from familial- to social-stressors experienced by children and young people. The current study therefore evaluates the model within the context of a commonly experienced social childhood stressor: peer-aggression.