Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Enzymatic solid-to-solid peptide synthesis

Erbeldinger, M. and Eichhorn, U. and Kuhl, P. and Halling, P.J. (2001) Enzymatic solid-to-solid peptide synthesis. In: Methods in Biotechnology: Enzymes in Nonaqueous Solvents. Methods in Biotechnology, 15 . Humana Press, NJ, USA, pp. 471-477. ISBN 089603-9293

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Solid-to-solid peptide synthesis is an enzyme-catalyzed reaction carried out in a mixture consisting of solid substrates and up to 20% (w/w) of enzyme solution in water. No organic solvents are necessary for the preparation of the initial reaction mixtures. Generally, solid-to-solid synthesis is considered to be a low-water reaction system because of the very high overall concentration of substrates used. However, from the enzyme's 'viewpoint,' the reaction mixture is just an aqueous solution saturated with substrates, as this is where the actual biotransformation takes place. Therefore, this approach combines advantages of both water- and solvent-based systems (i.e., high enzyme activity, high substrate concentration, and high degree of conversion to the final product). Another attraction of solid-to-solid synthesis is that it enables improved volumetric productivity in the reactor to be achieved. The avoidance of organic solvents is often advantageous too, especially for applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry.