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Trust-based model for privacy control in context aware systems

Wagealla, W. and Terzis, S. and English, C. (2003) Trust-based model for privacy control in context aware systems. In: Second Workshop on Security in Ubiquitous Computing at the Fifth Annual Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp2003), 2003-10-12 - 2003-10-15.

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Abstract

In context-aware systems, there is a high demand on providing privacy solutions to users when they are interacting and exchanging personal information. Privacy in this context encompasses reasoning about trust and risk involved in interactions between users. Trust, therefore, controls the amount of information that can be revealed, and risk analysis allows us to evaluate the expected benefit that would motivate users to participate in these interactions. In this paper, we propose a trust-based model for privacy control in context-aware systems based on incorporating trust and risk. Through this approach, it is clear how to reason about trust and risk in designing and implementing context-aware systems that provide mechanisms to protect users' privacy. Our approach also includes experiential learning mechanisms from past observations in reaching better decisions in future interactions. The outlined model in this paper serves as an attempt to solve the concerns of privacy control in context-aware systems. To validate this model, we are currently applying it on a context-aware system that tracks users' location. We hope to report on the performance evaluation and the experience of implementation in the near future.