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Influence of processing method on the exfoliation process for organically modified clay systems. I. Polyurethanes

Rhoney, I. and Brown, S. and Hudson, N.E. and Pethrick, R.A. (2004) Influence of processing method on the exfoliation process for organically modified clay systems. I. Polyurethanes. Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 91 (2). pp. 1335-1343. ISSN 0021-8995

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Abstract

The influence of different processing methods on the nature of the dispersion achieved in the creation of a polyurethane nanocomposite is presented. The nanocomposites were produced using two different types of organically modified montmorillonite clays and a sample of fine particles of silicon nitride as a reference material. Rheological data were used to assess the nature of the dispersion achieved using the different processing methods. The nature of the dispersion produced was characterized using wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements of the finally cured products. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was used to investigate the effect of the incorporation of clay platelets into the matrix of the polymer. The high-temperature modulus provides evidence of the interaction between the polymer and the clay platelets; however, surprisingly, the glass transition temperatures of the filled and unfilled materials were almost identical.