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The cl- channel blocker niflumic acid releases ca2+ from an intracellular store in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

Cruickshank, S.F. and Baxter, L.M. and Drummond, R.M. (2003) The cl- channel blocker niflumic acid releases ca2+ from an intracellular store in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. British Journal of Pharmacology, 140 (8). pp. 1442-1450. ISSN 0007-1188

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Abstract

The effect of the Cl− channel blockers niflumic acid (NFA), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB), 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), and anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A-9-C), on Ca2+ signalling in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was examined. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored with either fura-2 or fluo-4, and caffeine was used to activate the ryanodine receptor, thereby releasing Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). NFA and NPPB significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i and attenuated the caffeine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These Cl− channel blockers also increased the half-time (t1/2) to peak for the caffeine-induced [Ca2+]i transient, and slowed the removal of Ca2+ from the cytosol following application of caffeine. Since DIDS and A-9-C were found to adversely affect fura-2 fluorescence, fluo-4 was used to monitor intracellular Ca2+ in studies involving these Cl− channel blockers. Both DIDS and A-9-C increased basal fluo-4 fluorescence, indicating an increase in intracellular Ca2+, and while DIDS had no significant effect on the t1/2 to peak for the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient, it was significantly increased by A-9-C. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, NFA significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i, suggesting that the release of Ca2+ from an intracellular store was responsible for the observed effect. Depleting the SR with the combination of caffeine and cyclopiazonic acid prevented the increase in basal [Ca2+]i induced by NFA. Additionally, incubating the cells with ryanodine also prevented the increase in basal [Ca2+]i induced by NFA. These data show that Cl− channel blockers have marked effects on Ca2+ signalling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, examination of the NFA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i indicates that it is likely due to Ca2+ release from an intracellular store, most probably the SR.