Picture of virus under microscope

Research under the microscope...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

Explore SIPBS research

Traffic regulation and control in the Manhattan street network

Tayan, O. and Harle, D. (2004) Traffic regulation and control in the Manhattan street network. In: NETWORKING 2004, Networking Technologies, Services, and Protocols; Performance of Computer and Communication Networks; Mobile and Wireless Communications. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 3042 (3042/2). Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, Berlin, pp. 902-913. ISBN 0302-9743

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

The Manhattan Street Network (MSN) with the Clockwork Routing scheme has been proposed as a particularly suitable candidate for use in optical networks. However, without any medium access control (MAC), the success of the MSN with Clockwork Routing in optical networks would be inhibited by the destination-release protocol, since the protocol provides no guarantee of fair access or bounded traffic delay requirements of access nodes. Hence, new traffic regulation schemes providing medium access control are required to ensure fair access between network nodes and satisfy stringent quality of service (QoS) requirements of applications. This paper introduces a new scheme for medium access that supports fairness between competing access nodes while limiting the delay in the network. A ring model based on the return-to-trail property of the MSN is used to realise the logical behaviour of the MSN and connection services are regulated using a distributed view of the network loading.