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A comparison of adherence by four strains of Staphylococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus hominis to canine corneocytes collected from normal dogs and dogs suffering from atopic dermatitis

McEwan, N.A. and Kalna, G. and Mellor, D. (2004) A comparison of adherence by four strains of Staphylococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus hominis to canine corneocytes collected from normal dogs and dogs suffering from atopic dermatitis. Research in Veterinary Science, 78 (3). pp. 193-198.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the adherence of four strains of Staphylococcus intermedius and a single strain of Staphylococcus hominis to corneocytes from both normal dogs and dogs suffering from atopic dermatitis. Cells from the skin surface, corneocytes, were collected from 10 normal dogs and 10 dogs suffering from atopic dermatitis. Four strains of S. intermedius, three isolated from canine pyoderma skin lesions (strains A, B and C), and one isolated form from canine synovial membrane sample from a case of septic arthritis (strain D) were compared. S. hominis, which is not normally associated with canine disease, was also evaluated for its ability to adhere to canine corneocytes. S. hominis did not adhere to canine corneocytes. All four strains of S. intermedius adhered well to canine corneocytes collected from both normal and atopic dogs. All strains of S. intermedius showed statistically greater adherence to corneocytes collected from atopic dogs compared with those collected from normal dogs. It was concluded that the adherence assay employed here showed that S. hominis does not adhere to canine corneocytes, S. intermedius adheres preferentially to atopic corneocytes.