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The attitudes and behaviour of adolescent road users : an application of the theory of planned behaviour

Elliott, M.A. and , Department for Transport (Funder) (2004) The attitudes and behaviour of adolescent road users : an application of the theory of planned behaviour. [Report]

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Abstract

The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) was used as a framework to study the attitudes of adolescent road users towards four target behaviours: (1) cycle helmet use, (2) using nearby crossings, (3) crossing from between parked cars, and (4) challenging traffic. Four questionnaires, one for each of the behaviours, were designed based on pilot work. Each questionnaire contained items to measure the TPB variables, self-reported behaviour, and general exposure and demographic characteristics (e.g. age and gender). A total of 2,457 children aged 11-16 completed the questionnaires; 564 respondents completed the 'cycle helmet use' questionnaire; 657 respondents completed the 'using nearby crossings' questionnaire; 619 respondents completed the 'crossing from between parked cars' questionnaire; and 617 completed the 'challenging traffic' questionnaire. Multivariate analyses were conducted for each of the behaviours to explore how adolescents' attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, behavioural intentions and self-reported behaviour differed as a function of demographic variables. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were then conducted to test the relationships in the TPB and to identify beliefs underpinning adolescents' attitudes that could be targeted in road safety interventions. This report describes all aspects of the study and discusses the theoretical and practical implications.