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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

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Parental perspectives during the transition to adulthood of adolescents with a history of specific language impairment (SLI)

Conti-Ramsden, G. and Batting, N. and Durkin, K. (2008) Parental perspectives during the transition to adulthood of adolescents with a history of specific language impairment (SLI). Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 51 (1). pp. 84-96. ISSN 1092-4388

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Abstract

This is the 2nd article of a companion set (the 1st article being on language and independence). It presents research examining parental perspectives on aspects of impairment in their offspring involving families rearing children with specific language impairment (SLI). The same sample as that of the 1st study participated in this investigation: a total of 238 parents and their offspring (120 offspring with a history of SLI and 118 typically developing [TD] offspring). Parents were interviewed using the Transition Daily Rewards and Worries questionnaire (L. M. Glidden & B.M. Jobe, 2007; J. Menard, S. Schoolcraft, L. M. Glidden, & C. Lazarus, 2002). Measures of the adolescents' receptive and expressive language, reading, nonverbal IQ, and socioemotional functioning were obtained. Parents of adolescents with SLI have a range of perspectives regarding their offspring; some raise concerns, some are more positive. in addition, there is striking heterogeneity in the experiences of parents in the SLI group. Variables that influence being a concerned parent involve the adolescent's level of independence, quality of peer relations, his or her prosocial behavior, and the presence of conduct problems.