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The interplay between human b cells, eosinophils and helminths: a novel aspect of the hygiene hypothesis

Mammen, A. and Farraye, F.A. and Liang, Y. and Harnett, W. and Shin, H. and Harnett, M.M. and Nikolajczyk, B. and Ganley-Leal, L. (2008) The interplay between human b cells, eosinophils and helminths: a novel aspect of the hygiene hypothesis. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 79 (6). pp. 337-338. ISSN 0002-9637

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Abstract

The hygiene hypothesis is based on the premise that lack of exposure to helminths predisposes certain individuals to immune-mediated disease, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This hypothesis is supported by epidemiological data that shows developed countries with a low prevalence of helminth infections have higher incidence of allergic and inflammatory diseases. Helminths modulate the host immune response in a manner that dampens the exaggerated response to innocuous antigens, such as commensal bacteria.