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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Plasmacytoid dendritic cells regulate breach of self-tolerance in autoimmune arthritis

Jongbloed, S.L. and Benson, R.A. and Nickdel, M.B. and Garside, P. and McInnes, L.B. and Brewer, J.M. (2009) Plasmacytoid dendritic cells regulate breach of self-tolerance in autoimmune arthritis. Journal of Immunology, 182 (2). pp. 963-968. ISSN 0022-1767

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Abstract

Achieving remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive despite current biological therapeutics. Consequently, interest has increased in strategies to re-establish immune tolerance to provide long-term disease suppression. Although dendritic cells (DC) are prime candidates in initiating autoreactive T cell responses, and their presence within the synovial environment suggests a role in generation and maintenance of autoreactive, synovial T cell responses, their functional importance remains unclear. We investigated the contribution made by plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the spontaneous breach of tolerance to arthritis-related self proteins, including rheumatoid factor, citrullinated peptide, and type II collagen observed in a novel arthritis model. Selective pDC depletion in vivo enhanced the severity of articular pathology and enhanced T and B cell autoimmune responses against type II collagen. pDC may offer a net anti-inflammatory function in the context of articular breach of tolerance. Such data will be vital in informing DC modulatory/therapeutic approaches.