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Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Gram-negative non-fermenting bacteria from food-producing animals are low risk for hospital-acquired infections

Hamouda, A. and Vali, L. and Amyes, S.G.B. (2008) Gram-negative non-fermenting bacteria from food-producing animals are low risk for hospital-acquired infections. Journal of Chemotherapy, 20 (6). pp. 702-708. ISSN 1120-009X

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate possible indications of epidemiological relationships between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from food-producing animals and those of clinical origin. Screening for P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates from food-producing animals was carried out on 1381 samples. Susceptibility testing and PCR amplification of resistance genes were determined. Isolate clonal relatedness was established by PFGE. Forty-one P. aeruginosa and 16 A. baumannii were detected. All P. aeruginosa isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam and seven isolates had low-level imipenem resistance. All A. baumannii isolates were sensitive to imipenem, meropenem, ciprofloxacin and piperacillin/tazobactam but were resistant to ceftazidime. The imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and ceftazidime-resistant A. baumannii had different PFGE patterns compared to those of human origin. Based on the findings presented here, animal isolates were not multidrug resistant and they do belong to a different pool from those of humans.