Picture of scraped petri dish

Scrape below the surface of Strathprints...

Explore world class Open Access research by researchers at the University of Strathclyde, a leading technological university.

Explore

Gram-negative non-fermenting bacteria from food-producing animals are low risk for hospital-acquired infections

Hamouda, A. and Vali, L. and Amyes, S.G.B. (2008) Gram-negative non-fermenting bacteria from food-producing animals are low risk for hospital-acquired infections. Journal of Chemotherapy, 20 (6). pp. 702-708. ISSN 1120-009X

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate possible indications of epidemiological relationships between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from food-producing animals and those of clinical origin. Screening for P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates from food-producing animals was carried out on 1381 samples. Susceptibility testing and PCR amplification of resistance genes were determined. Isolate clonal relatedness was established by PFGE. Forty-one P. aeruginosa and 16 A. baumannii were detected. All P. aeruginosa isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam and seven isolates had low-level imipenem resistance. All A. baumannii isolates were sensitive to imipenem, meropenem, ciprofloxacin and piperacillin/tazobactam but were resistant to ceftazidime. The imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and ceftazidime-resistant A. baumannii had different PFGE patterns compared to those of human origin. Based on the findings presented here, animal isolates were not multidrug resistant and they do belong to a different pool from those of humans.