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Comparison of predictive equations for resting metabolic rate in obese psychiatric patients taking olanzapine

Skouroliakou, M. and Giannopoulou, I. and Kostara, C. and Vasilopoulou, M. (2009) Comparison of predictive equations for resting metabolic rate in obese psychiatric patients taking olanzapine. Nutrition, 25 (2). pp. 188-193. ISSN 0899-9007

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Abstract

Objective: The prediction of resting metabolic rate (RMR) is important to determine the energy expenditure of obese patients with severe mental illnesses (SMIs). However, there is lack of research concerning the most accurate RMR predictive equations. The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of four RMR equations on patients with SMIs taking olanzapine. Methods: One hundred twenty-eight obese (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) patients with SMIs (41 men and 87 women) treated with olanzapine were tested from 2005 to 2008. Measurements of anthropometric parameters (height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference) and body composition (using the BodPod) were performed at the beginning of the study. RMR was measured using indirect calorimetry. Comparisons between measured and estimated RMRs from four equations (Harris-Benedict adjusted and current body weights, Schofield, and Mifflin-St. Jeor) were performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Significant correlations were found between the measured and predicted RMRs with all four equations (P < 0.001), with the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation demonstrating the strongest correlation in men and women (r = 0.712, P < 0.001). In men and women, the Bland-Altman analysis revealed no significant bias in the RMR prediction using the Harris-Benedict adjusted body weight and the Mifflin equations (P > 0.05). However, in men and women, the Harris-Benedict current body weight and the Schofield equations showed significant overestimation error in the RMR prediction (P < 0.001). Conclusion: When estimating RMR in men and women with SMIs taking olanzapine, the Mifflin-St. Jeor and Harris-Benedict adjusted body weight equations appear to be the most appropriate for clinical use.

Item type: Article
ID code: 19293
Keywords: resting metabolic rate predictive equations, obese psychiatric patients, males, females, diet, Pharmacy and materia medica
Subjects: Medicine > Pharmacy and materia medica
Department: Faculty of Science > Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences
Related URLs:
    Depositing user: Strathprints Administrator
    Date Deposited: 09 Jun 2010 14:40
    Last modified: 06 Dec 2013 22:27
    URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/19293

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