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Inactivation of bacterial pathogens following exposure to light from a 405-nanometer light-emitting diode array

Maclean, Michelle and MacGregor, S.J. and Anderson, J.G. and Woolsey, G. (2009) Inactivation of bacterial pathogens following exposure to light from a 405-nanometer light-emitting diode array. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 75 (7). pp. 1932-1937. ISSN 0099-2240

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Abstract

This study demonstrates the susceptibility of a variety of medically important bacteria to inactivation by 405-nm light from an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), without the application of exogenous photosensitizer molecules. Selected bacterial pathogens, all commonly associated with hospital-acquired infections, were exposed to the 405-nm LED array, and the results show that both gram-positive and gram-negative species were successfully inactivated, with the general trend showing gram-positive species to be more susceptible than gram-negative bacteria. Detailed investigation of the bactericidal effect of the blue-light treatment on Staphylococcus aureus suspensions, for a range of different population densities, demonstrated that 405-nm LED array illumination can cause complete inactivation at high population densities: inactivation levels corresponding to a 9-log(10) reduction were achieved. The results, which show the inactivation of a wide range of medically important bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrate that, with further development, narrow-spectrum 405-nm visible-light illumination from an LED source has the potential to provide a novel decontamination method with a wide range of potential applications.

Item type: Article
ID code: 19234
Keywords: delta aminolevulinic acid, photodynamic therapy, blue light, in vitro, staphylococcus aureus, escherichia-coli, visible light, porphyrin, spectrum, Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering, Microbiology
Subjects: Technology > Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Science > Microbiology
Department: Faculty of Engineering > Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Related URLs:
    Depositing user: Strathprints Administrator
    Date Deposited: 14 Jun 2010 15:07
    Last modified: 18 Sep 2013 15:55
    URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/19234

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