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Can blood flow in the bone be measured using coloured labelled Microspheres?

Ghazzawi, H. and Abouel-Enin, S. and Reichert, I. and Gourlay, T. (2009) Can blood flow in the bone be measured using coloured labelled Microspheres? Internet Journal of Laboratory Medicine, 3 (2). ISSN 1937-8181

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Abstract

This study was designed to determine whether coloured micro-spheres represent a realistic alternative to more conventional techniques for the assessment of bone blood flow (BBF). BBF is normally measured using radioactive labelled micro-spheres, a technique that is accurate, but becoming increasingly challenged for safety and environmental reasons. Coloured micro-spheres come in two varieties, dye-fixed and dye eluting, and both have been employed for the measurement of blood flow in soft tissue for some time. However, measuring blood flow in bone presents a different challenge to that of soft tissue, insofar as the bone has to be dissolved using harsh chemicals to enable the harvesting of the micro-spheres for counting. This study therefore was designed to determine whether these micro-spheres would survive the harvesting process, and whether they could be identified and counted afterwards.