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Numerical and experimental comparisons of vortex-induced vibrations of marine risers in uniform/sheared currents

Srinil, N. and O'Brien, P. and Wiercigrocha, M. (2010) Numerical and experimental comparisons of vortex-induced vibrations of marine risers in uniform/sheared currents. In: The 29th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, 2010-06-06 - 2010-06-11.

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Abstract

This paper presents a general theoretical reduced-order model capable of evaluating the multi-mode nonlinear dynamics of marine risers subject to uniform and sheared currents. The main objectives are to predict the vortex-induced vibration responses and parametrically compare between numerical and experimental results. The emphasis is placed on the analysis of cross-flow vibrations due to unsteady lift forces. The nonlinear equations governing riser axial/transversal motions are derived based on a top-tensioned beam model with typical pinned-pinned boundary conditions. The riser geometric nonlinearities owing to possible large dynamic displacements and multi-mode interactions are accounted for. To approximate the space-time varying lift force, the empirical hydrodynamic model, based on a nonlinear van der Pol wake oscillator with a distributed diffusive term, is used. A low-dimensional dynamic model and computationally-robust time-domain tool are then developed to evaluate the multi-mode fluid-riser interactions. These are very useful in dealing with large parametric studies involving varying system parameters.

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  • Numerical and experimental comparisons of vortex-induced vibrations of marine risers in uniform/sheared currents. (deposited 07 Apr 2010 09:40) [Currently Displayed]