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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

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Comparative ecology of over-wintering Calanus finmarchicus in the northern North Atlantic, and implications for life-cycle patterns

Heath, Michael R. and Boyle, Peter R. and Gislason, Astthor and Gurney, William S.C. and Hay, Stephen J and Head, Erica J.H and Holmes, Steven and Ingvarsdóttir, Anna and Jónasdóttir, Sigrun H and Lindeque, Pennie and Pollard, Raymond T and Rasmussen, Jens and Richards, Kelvin and Richardson, Katherine and Smerdon, Gary and Speirs, Douglas C, European Union (Funder) (2004) Comparative ecology of over-wintering Calanus finmarchicus in the northern North Atlantic, and implications for life-cycle patterns. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 61 (4). pp. 698-708. ISSN 1054-3139

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Abstract

Data from plankton net and Optical Plankton Counter sampling during 12 winter cruises between 1994 and 2002 have been used to derive a multi-annual composite 3-D distribution of the abundance of over-wintering Calanus finmarchicus in a swath across the North Atlantic from Labrador to Norway. Dense concentrations occurred in the Labrador Sea, northern Irminger Basin, northern Iceland Basin, eastern Norwegian Sea, Faroe-Shetland Channel, and in the Norwegian Trench of the North Sea. A model of buoyancy regulation in C. finmarchicus was used to derive the lipid content implied by the in situ temperature and salinity at over-wintering depths, assuming neutral buoyancy. The Faroe-Shetland Channel and eastern Norwegian Sea emerged as having the highest water column-integrated abundances of copepodites, the lowest over-wintering temperature, and the highest implied lipid content. The results are discussed in the context of spatial persistence of populations, seasonal patterns of abundance, and relationships between over-wintering and lipid accumulation in the surface waters.