Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

The demand for industrial-development certificates and the effect of regional policy

Ashcroft, B.K. and McGregor, P.G. (1989) The demand for industrial-development certificates and the effect of regional policy. Regional Studies, 23 (4). pp. 301-314. ISSN 0034-3404

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

The demand for industrial development certificates and the effect of regional policy, Reg. Studies 23,301-314. Attempts to cstimate the effects of UK regional policy are frequently restricted by lack of data. However, this paper uses the statistics resulting from the policy of Industrial Development Certificate (ID C) control to construct a space-factor-demand model of the demand for industrial floorspace. The IDC data set is viewed as reflccting observations on successive stages of a factor-demand model and allowance is made for spatial substitution as well as the more usual factor substitution possibilities. The effects of different regional policy instruments are modelled including the transmission mechanism through which IDC policy exerts its effect on Development Areas (DAs). The results of estimation appear to provide considerable support for our hypotheses: applications for ID C and hence demands for floorspace in D As are found to increase as national output rises; individual incentives are shown to have induced factor substitution suggesting that incentives for industrial buildings and plant and machinery are not additive in their effect on factor demands; own-location factor substitution effects of incentives appear to dominate any spatial substitution effects that they may have generated directly; factor availabilities appear to have induced a predominant spatial substitution effect; and finally, ID C policy appears to have played a significant role in reducing the spatial isolation ofD As and enhancing the effectiveness ofthe financial incentives.