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Relationships between radiological and biochemical-evidence of rickets in asian schoolchildren

Abdul-Motaal, A.A. and Gettinby, G. and McIntosh, W B and Sutherland, G R and Dunnigan, M G (1985) Relationships between radiological and biochemical-evidence of rickets in asian schoolchildren. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 61 (714). pp. 307-312. ISSN 0032-5473

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Abstract

One hundred Asian schoolchildren provided evidence of the relationships between radiological and biochemical evidence of rickets in a vitamin D-deficient population. In a retrospective study of the X-rays of 56 children the variables serum alkaline phosphatase, inorganic phosphorus and age provided a discriminant function which correctly classified 10 of 11 children with radiological evidence of rickets and 44 of 45 children with negative or marginally abnormal X-rays. When the discriminant function was applied to a prospective study of 44 children, three children with radiological evidence of rickets were correctly classified together with 38 of the remaining 41 children with negative or marginally abnormal X-rays. Serum alkaline phosphatase was the most important variable in the discriminant analysis, followed by serum inorganic phosphorus and age. Low levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) are of little value in predicting the severity of radiological evidence of rachitic bone disease in a vitamin D-deficient population.