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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

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Effect of sustained release and pulse release anthelmintic intraruminal devices on development of pathophysiological changes and parasite populations in calves infected with Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora

Holmes, P.H. and Bairden, K. and McKechnie, D. and Gettinby, G. and McWilliam, P.N. (1991) Effect of sustained release and pulse release anthelmintic intraruminal devices on development of pathophysiological changes and parasite populations in calves infected with Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora. Research in Veterinary Science, 51 (2). pp. 223-226.

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Abstract

An experiment was conducted in calves to investigate the effect of sustained release and pulse release anthelmintic intraruminal boli on the development of pathophysiological changes following daily infection with Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora for six weeks. After infection various pathophysiological changes were detected including increases in serum pepsinogen concentration, enteric plasma protein losses and in the catabolic rate of albumin. Such changes developed rapidly in the unprotected calves following patency after 17 days and persisted until the termination of the study. There were indications that the sustained anthelmintic release device was more efficacious than the pulse anthelmintic release device in reducing the worm burdens and early pathophysiological changes associated with infection. It was found at necropsy that the release of anthelmintic by the oxfendazole pulse release bolus had been delayed in several calves.