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Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Factors influencing infections in Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on cattle infected with Theileria parva

Young, A.S. and Dolan, T.T. and Morzaria, S.P. and Mwakima, F.N. and Norval, R.A.I. and Scott, J. and Sherriff, A. and Gettinby, G. (1996) Factors influencing infections in Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on cattle infected with Theileria parva. Parasitology, 113. pp. 255-266. ISSN 0031-1820

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Abstract

A large database on the transmission of a stabilate of the Theileria parva Muguga stock from one breed of cattle using two stocks of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, Muguga and Ol Pejeta was developed and analysed. Factors associated with the ticks and cattle, and the infections developing in cattle were studied in relation to the infection variables in the tick batches harvested daily from cattle. Generalized Linear Interactive Modelling (GLIM) was used to determine the importance of factors and interactions in influencing the levels of tick infection variables using Type I and Type III sums of squares analyses. Analysis of the 6 variables, prevalence (percentage of ticks infected), abundance (mean number of infected salivary gland acini per tick examined) and intensity (mean number of infected salivary gland acini per infected tick) in batches of 30 male and 30 female ticks showed that 24 covariates, factors or interactions had a significant effect (P> 0·05). Certain covariates and factors were particularly important for all 6 tick infection variables; parasitaemia of animal on the day of tick harvest, stabilate dilution administered to animal, month in which tick batch was harvested, minimum packed cell volume of animal over the sampling period, age of animal, and the minimum leukocyte count of the animal over the sampling period. The GLIM analyses were found to be a useful tool in identifying factors that influence infection levels and in devising methods of producing tick batches with more predictable infections.