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Susceptibility to trypanosomosis of three bos indicus cattle breeds in areas of differing tsetse fly challenge

Mwangi, E.K. and Stevenson, P. and Gettinby, G. and Reid, S.W.J. and Murray, M. (1998) Susceptibility to trypanosomosis of three bos indicus cattle breeds in areas of differing tsetse fly challenge. Veterinary Parasitology, 79 (1). pp. 1-17. ISSN 0304-4017

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Abstract

Studies to assess the differences in susceptibility to trypanosomosis among Bos indicus cattle breeds (Maasai Zebu, Orma Boran and Galana Boran) were conducted under conditions of varying tsetse fly challenge at the Nguruman escarpment in south-western Kenya, for a period of 1 year. It was found that under tsetse challenge quantified as high, Maasai Zebu and Orma Boran were less susceptible than Galana Boran to trypanosome infections, as judged by the significantly lower incidence of infection, development of less severe anaemia, fewer requirements for trypanocidal drug treatments, higher growth rates and fewer mortalities. In the area where tsetse challenge was considered low as a result of a tsetse fly control operation using odour-baited traps, only the Maasai Zebu and Orma Boran were compared. No significant differences in the incidence of infection, degree of anaemia or growth rates were observed between the two breeds, but all were significantly different from their counterparts in the high tsetse challenge area. These results suggest that there is variation in resistance to trypanosomosis among Bos indicus cattle breeds that could be exploited as part of the integrated trypanosomosis control programmes in East Africa.