Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

An investigation into personality and situation in the maintenance if subjective experience in a laboratory

Obonsawin, Marc and Smallwood, J. and Heim, D. and Reid, H. (2001) An investigation into personality and situation in the maintenance if subjective experience in a laboratory. Imagination, Cognition and Personality Consciousness in Theory - Research - Clinical Practice, 21 (4). pp. 319-322. ISSN 0276-2366

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between personality variables, task processing, and the self-report of subjective experience, including thought content, time perception, and awareness of task stimuli. In particular, this study was concerned with dis-entangling the role of environmental and dispositional influences on subjective experience. Thirty-eight participants were engaged in either a memory or a fluency task during which verbal reports of various aspects of subjective experience were recorded. Personality variables were measured using the Self-Consciousness Scale and the Thought Occurrence Questionnaire. The pattern of correlations between specific subjective aspects of attention and dispositional indices suggested that dispositional variables were important in determining subjective experience during the memory task, particularly in the encoding phase. In the fluency task, disposition made a smaller contribution to specific measures of attention, a finding consistent with a self-regulatory framework. Finally, the report of thoughts unrelated to the current situation were proportional to the number of false positives reported in the memory task, supporting the assertion that the quality of phenomenal experience is important in the process of source monitoring.