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Turning a deaf ear to fear: Impaired recognition of vocal affect in psychopathic individuals

Kelly, Steve and Blair, R. and Mitchell, D. and Richell, R. and Leonard, A. and Newman, C. and Scott, S. (2002) Turning a deaf ear to fear: Impaired recognition of vocal affect in psychopathic individuals. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 111 (4). pp. 682-686. ISSN 0021-843X

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The processing of emotional expressions is fundamental for normal socialization and interaction. Reduced responsiveness to the expressions of sadness and fear has been implicated in the development of psychopathy (R. J. R. Blair, 1995). The current study investigates the ability of adult psychopathic individuals to process vocal affect. Psychopathic and nonpsychopathic adults, defined by the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 1991), were presented with neutral words spoken with intonations conveying happiness, disgust, anger, sadness, and fear and were asked to identify the emotion of the speaker on the basis of prosody. The results indicated that psychopathic inmates were particularly impaired in the recognition of fearful vocal affect. These results are interpreted with reference to the low-fear and violence inhibition mechanism models of psychopathy.

Item type: Article
ID code: 1734
Keywords: emotion, educational psychology, psychopathy, Psychology
Subjects: Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology
Department: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (HaSS) > School of Psychological Science and Health > Psychology
Depositing user: Strathprints Administrator
Date Deposited: 02 Nov 2006
Last modified: 21 May 2015 08:22

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