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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

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Dimethylsulfoxide oxidizes glutathione in vitro and in human erythrocytes: kinetic analysis by H-1 NMR

Homer, Natalie Z.M. and Reglinski, J. and Sowden, Rebecca J. and Spickett, C.M. and Wilson, Rhoda and Walker, James J. (2005) Dimethylsulfoxide oxidizes glutathione in vitro and in human erythrocytes: kinetic analysis by H-1 NMR. Cryobiology, 50 (3). pp. 317-324. ISSN 0011-2240

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Abstract

The interaction of dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO) with glutathione was investigated under non-equilibrium conditions in solution using 1H NMR and in intact erythrocytes using 1H spin-echo NMR. In solution the reaction was observed to follow second-order kinetics (Rate = k1[glutathione][Me2SO]) at 300 K pH 7.4, ksol = 4.7 × 10−5 mol −1 L1 s−1. In intact erythrocytes the rate constant for the cellular environment, kcell, was found to be slightly larger at 8.1 × 10−5 mol−1 L1 s−1. Furthermore, the reaction of Me2SO with erythrocyte glutathione showed a biphasic dependence on the Me2SO concentration, with little oxidation of glutathione occurring until the Me2SO concentration exceeded 0.5 mol L−1. The results suggest that at lower concentrations, Me2SO can be effectively removed, most probably by reaction with glutathione, which is regenerated by glutathione reductase, although preferential reaction with other cellular components (e.g., membrane or cellular thiols) cannot be ruled out. Thus the concentrations of Me2SO that are commonly used in cryopreservation of mammalian cells (1.4 mol L−1) can cause oxidation of intracellular glutathione.