Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Alcohol consumption, perceptions of community responses, and attitudes to service provision: Results from a survey of Indian, Chinese and Pakistani young people in Greater Glasgow, Scotland, UK

Hunter, Simon C. and Ross, A. and Heim, D. and Bakshi, N. and Davies, J. and Flatley, K. (2004) Alcohol consumption, perceptions of community responses, and attitudes to service provision: Results from a survey of Indian, Chinese and Pakistani young people in Greater Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 39 (3). pp. 220-226. ISSN 0735-0414

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The aim of this study is to gather prevalence data regarding alcohol consumption and gauge perceptions of community responses to alcohol and service provision in a sample of Pakistani, Indian and Chinese young people aged 16-25 years, in Greater Glasgow, Scotland, UK. A survey methodology utilizing purposive sampling techniques (n = 174) was employed. Data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Alcohol consumption amongst the target populations is currently lower than that of the general population. Predictors of alcohol consumption were found to include self-reported importance of religion (a negative association with consumption) and having same-ethnicity friends who drink alcohol. There was a lack of consensus amongst participants regarding whether service provision should be part of the mainstream or specialist for black and minority ethnic individuals. Alcohol consumption in the target populations may be increasing and service provision could benefit by including specialist services for black and minority ethnic groups, in addition to mainstream services that need to be culturally sensitive.