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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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A statistical system for detecting Salmonella outbreaks in British livestock

Kosmider, R and Kelly, L and Evans, S and Gettinby, G (2006) A statistical system for detecting Salmonella outbreaks in British livestock. Infection and Epidemiology, 134 (5). pp. 952-960. ISSN 0950-2688

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Abstract

Worldwide, early detection systems have been used in public health to aid the timely detection of increases in disease reporting that may be indicative of an outbreak. To date, their application to animal surveillance has been limited and statistical methods to analyse human health data have not been viewed as being applicable for animal health surveillance data. This issue was investigated by developing an early detection system for Salmonella disease in British livestock. We conclude that an early detection system, as for public health surveillance, can be an effective tool for enhanced surveillance. In order to implement this system in the future and extend it for other data types, we provide recommendations for improving the current data collection process. These recommendations will ensure that quality surveillance data are collected and used effectively to monitor disease in livestock populations.