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All-sky LIGO search for periodic gravitational waves in the early fifth-science-run data

Abbott, B.P. and Abbott, R. and Adhikari, R. and Ajith, P. and Allen, B. and Allen, G. and Amin, R.S. and Anderson, S.B. and Lockerbie, N.A., LIGO Sci Collaboration (2009) All-sky LIGO search for periodic gravitational waves in the early fifth-science-run data. Physical Review Letters, 102 (11). ISSN 0031-9007

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Abstract

We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1100 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -5×10-9-0  Hz s-1. Data from the first eight months of the fifth LIGO science run (S5) have been used in this search, which is based on a semicoherent method (PowerFlux) of summing strain power. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitational radiation, we report 95% confidence-level upper limits on radiation emitted by any unknown isolated rotating neutron stars within the search range. Strain limits below 10-24 are obtained over a 200-Hz band, and the sensitivity improvement over previous searches increases the spatial volume sampled by an average factor of about 100 over the entire search band. For a neutron star with nominal equatorial ellipticity of 10-6, the search is sensitive to distances as great as 500 pc.