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The kinetics of semiconductor photocatalysis in activity-indicator films

Mills, A. and Cusick, A. and Hepburn, J. (2009) The kinetics of semiconductor photocatalysis in activity-indicator films. Journal of Advanced Oxidation Technologies, 12 (2). pp. 152-157. ISSN 1203-8407

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Abstract

The kinetics of dye reduction, in photocatalyst indicator ink films on self cleaning glass, is studied with respect to dye concentration. The water-based, photocatalyst indicator inks comprised a redox dye, Dox, a sacrificial electron donor (glycerol) and a polymer, hydroxyethyl cellulose. The dyes used were: Resazurin (Rz), dichloroindophenol (DCIP) and methylene blue (MB), although the latter required acidification of the ink (0.01M HCl) to make it work effectively under ambient conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, the photoreduction of each of the dyes, in an otherwise identical ink formulation, on Activ™ self-cleaning glass is zero-order with respect to [Dox]. Seven commercial samples of Rz, each in a typical ink formulation, were tested on the same piece of self-cleaning glass under aerobic conditions and produced a striking range (over 280%) of different apparent activities for the glass, when there should have been none. The underlying cause of this variation in assessed activity is shown to be due to the combination of a variation in the purity of the commercial samples and the zero-order nature of the kinetics of indicator dye reduction. The relevance of this work and the latter observation, in particular to future use of these films for the rapid assessment of the activities of new and established photocatalytic films, is briefly discussed.