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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Attributing to positive and negative sporting outcomes: a structural analysis

Davies, John B. and Ross, Alastair J. and Clarke, Peter (2004) Attributing to positive and negative sporting outcomes: a structural analysis. Athletic Insight, 6 (3). ISSN 1536-0431

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Abstract

Orthodox methodologies in sport-attribution research generally do not allow for variance in use of attribution per se to be investigated. Generally, attributions for pre- identified sporting outcomes are solicited from each athlete or research participant. Evidence is presented in this paper which shows a significant drop in attributions given for such events when specific prompts for explanation are removed. A qualitative methodology which allows athletes to 'freely' attribute to events of their own choosing is described. The method allows athletes to ascribe multiple causes to events (or multiple events to the same cause). Reliability data for coding texts in terms of explanatory function are provided. Results confirm previous evidence for an increased tendency to give explanations after negative outcomes, and are discussed in terms of the motivation of perceived control.