Picture of flying drone

Award-winning sensor signal processing research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers involved in award-winning research into technology for detecting drones. - but also other internationally significant research from within the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering.

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Colonial mission and imperial tropical medicine : Livingstone College, London, 1893-1914

Johnson, R. (2010) Colonial mission and imperial tropical medicine : Livingstone College, London, 1893-1914. Social History of Medicine, 23 (3). pp. 549-566. ISSN 0951-631X

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

With greater numbers of medical missionaries and colonial state physicians in Britain's tropical colonies at the turn of the twentieth century, British foreign missionaries are thought to have disengaged from medical work. This article redresses this misconception by investigating the training of missionaries in the new tropical medicine at Livingstone College, London, and their subsequent experiences throughout Britain's tropical empire. Many became active in preventative programmes, and were encouraged to spread the principles of modern tropical medicine along with the gospel. Nonetheless, missionaries trained at Livingstone College were not practising medicine that could be described as imperial or tropical. The bulk of their work was basic first aid that resembled care in metropolitan Britain. Therefore, what made the medicine they learned and practised both imperial and tropical, were the ideas, hopes and ambitions placed in it for furthering Britain's imperial goals and winning converts to christianity throughout the tropical empire.